Marananga & Our Community

Little is known about the early origins of Gnadenfrei, or Marananga as we know it today. When Michael stumbled across a run-down cottage on Neldner Road way back in the early days of Two Hands, little did he know that Marananga would become a hub of hedonistic delights 20 years later!!

Friedrich Wilhelm Fritz Kraehe was one of the original settlers of Gnadenfrei and our Cellar Door is named in honour of him. He arrived in South Australia on Australia Day, 1859 and settled in Gnadenfrei on farming land neighbouring our Cellar Door, and that of nearby winery Powell and Son. He had a significant impact on the settlement but the end of his life was fraught with sickness and he took his own life in 1915, aged 69 years. He and his family can be found buried in St Michael’s Cemetery.

The land on which the Two Hands Cellar door now stands was granted to Heinrich Burghard Theodor Jacobs in 1851. In 1853 Friedrich Gottfried Ludwig Qualmann of Langmiel and Daniel Heinrich Christian Busch of Harris’s Flat both farmers jointly acquired the land. The property was divided in 1864.

Friedrich Qualmann transferred his portion, the site of our Cellar Door, to Johann Gottlob Arnold, one of the original settlers in 1879, who then transferred the land to his son Carl Freidrich Arnold. Carl and Bertha Arnold built the house after their marriage. They had 7 children. Carl Arnold worked in Greenock at the Greenock Arms Hotel (which was across the road from what now is The Greenock), as an ostler (someone who tended to guests horses when staying at the inn). He died in 1940 and the land and home was willed to his son Friedrich Wilhelm Arnold (who built the house next to the school property with the cream and red bricks). After his death in 1961 the property was transferred out of the family. The headstones of Carl and Bertha and many of their descendants can be found in St Michael’s cemetery today.

Two Hands acquired the land and dilapidated and un-inhabited house in 2002 by making the then owners of the property an offer they couldn’t refuse and we restored the house to its former glory, opening the Cellar Door and Bakehouse in December 2003. The winery was opened in 2004.

We’re delighted to be part of this peaceful gem, steeped in much Barossa history– so much so, we named our ‘Uber-Premium’ Shiraz ‘My Hands’ as a nod to the place we call home. Gnadenfrei means ‘grace’ and ‘freedom’. Marananga means “My hands” in the Aboriginal language of the Overland Corner tribe.

We share our home surrounded by vineyards, wineries, accommodation & distillery! Within walking distance, you can visit Greenock Creek Wines, Seppeltsfield Road Distillers, Torbreck, Tscharke Wines, or stay the night at The Louise & The Villas.

Whilst you’re ‘Slowing Down’ through Marananga or onto your next sub-region our Seppeltsfield Road friends can keep you in The West. Seppeltsfield, Hentley Farm, Hayes Family Wines, Barossa Valley Estate, David Franz, Whistler, Izway, Fino Seppeltsfield, Jam Factory & Maggie Beer’s The Farm Eatery.

We are proudly Barossan and became Gold Foundation member donors to the Barossa Cellar development.